My first year as a troop leader, I got very lucky. I had 18 girls in my troop and 16 of their moms offered to volunteer and help! While I seemed to have more than enough people to help, many of my fellow troop leaders struggled. I wondered, what I had done that they hadn’t? Did I just get the perfect mix of girls and parents? Were they volunteering because most of them were new? Why was it that some troops seem to have no shortage of volunteers allowing their meetings and campouts to always run smoothly?

Even though parents can be some of the busiest people around, here are some tried and true ways I’ve always gotten parents to jump on board:

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1. Set an expectation that everyone volunteers and we are in this together.

My first opportunity to let parents know I need their help is when new members join the group. We always welcome each new member and their family at the girls’ first troop meeting. I introduce key members of our troop leadership and I let parents know that they will be asked to volunteer for at least one thing. Usually I list in writing which things I know I’ll need help with and a brief description of what duties are involved. This way parents are free to select what interests them.  

Some of these jobs might be helping pack for the camping trip, cookie mom, bringing snacks, or cutting out pieces for SWAPS. Your troop will have different positions depending on your year, so customize your own list according to your needs. Let everyone know that by pitching in and helping even with a small task means no one gets all the work dumped upon him or her. It’s an important lesson for the girls to learn too.  

A few jobs you might need filled in your troop are: 

  • Troop Treasurer 
  • Cookie Mom 
  • Initial Cookie Check-Out  Assistant 
  • Snack Planning 
  • Carpool Drivers 
  • Camping Lead 
  • SWAPS Mom 
  • Recruitment Supporter 
  • Community Outreach 
  • Event Planning (bridging ceremonies, holiday parties, Court of Awards, etc.) 

2. Use a family talent survey and require every family to fill one out.

This is a survey where parents are asked about their own Scouting background as well as what talents and tasks they may be able to help with. From this you can learn a lot about who’s on your team! When my girls’ parents completed their surveys, I quickly discovered we had tons of parents with camping gear and the skills to go with it. We also learned 10 parents were CPR certified and 2 worked in the medical field. Go through your roster and make sure every parent has responded, and remind non-responders that this is one way you can get to know them and learn how they all can support the troop.  

3. Plan a family event and then fit the job to the personality.

When you host a fun family event, you’ll quickly learn a lot about the parents in your troop. It’s true that some folks love to be in front of kids, some have great teaching skills, while others are terrified, and don’t know what to do. At our family events we make sure to have a mix of activities, games and teambuilding-type activities that everyone participates in with their girls. Here are a few ideas to get everyone working together: 

This gives everyone an opportunity to have fun together and you’ll quickly know everyone’s personalities from how they participate.  

4. Ask parents personally for their help.

In the age of social media and email, avoid the mistake of asking for volunteers by a broadcast email. That approach almost never works and will only cause you frustration. It’s also important that you refrain from complaining publicly about a lack of volunteers in your troop. Honestly, nothing scares off helpers faster than someone that’s complaining.  

Instead address parents in a small group or in a one-on-one conversation. Make sure you speak with a positive tone and avoid being confrontational. Campouts, BBQs, and events that are geared to be “mixers” are a perfect time to ask, because parents tend to be relaxed and not stressed about their other obligations. Don’t feel like you have to fill every role by the end of your first month of meetings. Some people may need to get to know you and your group before they step up.  

5. Once someone says yes, follow up and set them up for success.

As soon as you can, you’ll also want to contact the volunteer to give them all the information they need to be successful. You’ll also need to let them know if there is any training specific to their position that they will need to attend or complete such as a criminal background check.   

For instance a dad that wants to take the lead on camping trips needs to not only register as an adult and get a background check, he’ll also need to take your council’s required training. A mom that said she wants to help with cookies might need to attend an online training or come to a Service Unit meeting to get information on how Girl Scout Cookie sale works. Since some of these trainings can be done online and some must be done in person, it’s important to provide them with this information. Some places you can find trainings and required classes for our council are: 

6. Recognize the volunteer right away.

Once someone says they will help, make sure you thank them. I like to write a personal note and hand it to them at the next meeting. Also at the next troop meeting, in front of all the parents and girls, announce the new volunteer’s role. Then ask everyone to thank him or her for stepping up and helping support the troop. This makes the newcomer feel great about volunteering and makes it a bit tougher to back out! It also lets the girls know they have a team supporting their Girl Scout experience throughout the year! 

Follow these tips and keep a positive attitude and you’ll quickly learn that there are many parents that want to help! 

Do you have any volunteer recruiting tips? Share them with us in the comments below! 


Richel NewborgRichel Newborg—Richel is a troop leader to Troop 2740 located in Fort Worth, Texas (although she was born and raised in California). Her Mom and Grandmother were also Girl Scout Leaders. Her favorite memory so far as a troop leader was packing friends, family, and excited girls into her living room (almost 50 people) when their bridging/rededication ceremony was rained out. It was crowded but an awesome celebration of Girl Scouting and they even managed to have a real bridge!